Education 2030

This is an interesting set of essays from the Hoover Institution Task Force on K-12 Education entitled ?American Education in 2030.?
Authors include:
Chester E. Finn Jr. is a senior fellow at the Hoover Institution and chairman of the Koret Task Force on K?12 Education.
John E. Chubb, a distinguished visiting fellow at the Hoover Institution and a member of Hoover?s Koret Task Force on K?12 Education, is a founder and chief executive officer of Leeds Global Partner, an international education consulting and services firm, and was a founder of EdisonLearning.
Williamson M. Evers, a research fellow at the Hoover Institution and a member of the Institution?s Koret Task Force on K?12 Education, was the U.S. assistant secretary of education for policy from 2007 to 2009.
Eric Hanushek is the Paul and Jean Hanna Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution, Stanford University and a member of the Institution?s Koret Task Force on K?12 Education. He is best known for introducing rigorous economic analysis into educational policy deliberations.
Paul T. Hill, a distinguished visiting fellow at the Hoover Institution and a member of Hoover?s Koret Task Force on K?12 Education, is the John and Marguerite Corbally Professor of Public Affairs at the University of Washington-Bothell and director of the Center of Reinventing Public Education.
Caroline Hoxby is the Scott and Donya Bommer Professor of Economics at Stanford University, a senior fellow at the Hoover Institution, a member of the Institution?s Koret Task Force on K?12 Education, the director of the Economics of Education Program at the National Bureau of Economic Research, and a presidential appointee to the National Board of Education Sciences.
Tom Loveless is a member of the Koret Task Force on K?12 Education. He is also a senior fellow at the Brown Center on Education Policy at the Brookings Institution.
Terry M. Moe is a senior fellow at the Hoover Institution, a member of the Institution’s Koret Task Force on K?12 education, and the William Bennett Munro Professor of political science at Stanford University.
Paul E. Peterson is a senior fellow at the Hoover Institution and a member of the Koret Task Force on K?12 Education, and editor in chief of Education Next: A Journal of Opinion and Research.
Herbert J. Walberg, a distinguished visiting fellow at the Hoover Institution and a member of the Koret Task Force on K?12 Education, taught for 35 years at Harvard and the University of Illinois at Chicago. Grover J. (?Russ?) Whitehurst is a member of the Koret Task Force on K?12 Education. He is also the Brown Chair, senior fellow, and director of the Brown Center on Education Policy at the Brookings Institution, where he is responsible for shaping public and political opinion on education policy based on findings from research.

In these essays, members of the Hoover Institution’s Task Force on K-12 education, joined by several keen-eyed observers, blend prediction with prescription to paint a vivid picture of American primary and secondary education in 2030. What follows is necessarily speculative, and readers may judge portions to be wishful thinking or politically naïve. But none of it is fanciful-we’re not writing fiction here-and all of it, in the authors’ views, is desirable. That is to say, the changes outlined here would yield a more responsive, efficient, effective, nimble, and productive K-12 education system than we have today.
Readers should note, however, that each essay is complete unto itself; they were not written to yield a single coherent model in which all the pieces fit neatly together. Several cover overlapping territory (e.g., technology, which is apt to pervade our future), and others yield differing predictions about the same phenomenon (e.g., national standards and testing).
The opening essay by Paul Peterson seeks to show what education will be like in 2030 if nothing changes, that is, if today’s trends are simply extrapolated.
The following thirteen essays are clustered into Curriculum and Instruction (five essays), Standards and Testing (two), Governance and Finance (four), and Privatization and Choice (two).
The set concludes with a recap by Chester Finn of what actually changed in American education from 1990 to 2010: evidence of what’s possible during the next two decades.
The website is here

Related Videos are here

Source: http://web.me.com/timholt/Intended_Consequenses/Intended_Consequences_v._2.0/Entries/2010/11/13_Education_2030.html

star marketing online network marketing online marketing online degree

Advertisements
This entry was published on April 2, 2012 at 9:33 pm and is filed under Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink. Follow any comments here with the RSS feed for this post.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: